Advent

  • "For a child has been born for us, a son given to us; authority rests upon his shoulders; and he is named Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace." -- Isaiah 9:6

    This year continues to bring us face to face with things we will miss and opportunities to build new traditions. We will miss being in person for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day services. Yet in the midst of the grief and challenges of this pandemic, God’s grace with it’s persistent nature of blessings, is doing new things.

    We hope that you are able to gather with us for Christmas Worship.  Our Christmas Worship opportunities are:

    • 7:00pm Christmas Eve - This festival Service of Holy Communion will include a re-telling of the Christmas Story by our youth, all recorded and edited remotely. And we are inviting everyone who can to have at least one candle (or one for everyone in your household) ready to light when we sing Silent Night together on Christmas Eve. We may not be able to hear each other sing, but if we all turn our video on for at least that portion of worship, we can be joined in a tangible sign of togetherness and a sea of beautiful light.
    • 10:30am Christmas Day - We'll gather for a service of the Word with more Christmas Carol singing, and our wonderful family musicians.

    Yes, many things may be different this year, but the irrepressible nature of God’s blessings, spilling over into this world through our Savior’s birth remains a constant, and invites us to constant praise as we remember that Jesus, Emmanuel, is indeed “God with us.”

  • There’s a story in this month’s Living Lutheran online and print magazine that tells about how Lim Forgey, the music minister at Christ Lutheran Church, Visalia, California, noticed children playing outside the dumpster by the church. Lim noticed that one of the children wasn’t even wearing shoes. (Living Lutheran, Nov. 2018)

    Now there are many stories in the news about children in need in this country and around the world, stories of families stuck in hard times because of job loss or illness, because they’ve had to flee violence and are stuck in refugee camps or at borders. It can be easy to lose heart when we read or hear or watch about such stories day after day.

  • As we move through this season of Advent, this season of preparation for the Festival arrival of our Savior the Christ child, we Prepare to welcome Joy incarnate.

    But what does this Preparation look like, and what does this Joy mean?

    I imagine that many of us have heard and are familiar with the words from Isaiah, associated with John the Baptist: “Prepare the way of the Lord!” Yet We may be less familiar with another portion of this same passage, in which the prophet Isaiah says that this preparation is so that “all flesh shall see the salvation of God.”